Cybercrime

Interview Form for Use When Questioning a Cyber-Crime Victim: Investigation Compiled by Cybercrime Attorney William Ryan Moore

Internet Access
1. Who is your Internet service provider (ISP)?
2. What kind of Internet service do you have?
a. Dial up b. DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) c. Cable d. Wireless
3. Where did this occur? (your home, work, school, etc.?)
4. What are your email addresses?
5. Who owns the computer you used? (you, your employer, school, parents, etc.)
6. Did you access the Internet through a network? (employer, school, etc.)
7. Did you access the Internet through a wireless network and is so where?  

Chat-Related Crimes

1. What was the chat service where this occurred?
2. What was the date and time this occurred?
3. What is the chatroom( s) name where this occurred?
4. What is your screen name or nickname in this chatroom? What is the suspect’s screen name or nickname? Do you know their real name?
5. Did the chatroom have an operator or moderator and if so, what is their screen name or nickname? Do you know their real name?
6. Did you recognize anyone else in the chatroom and if so, what is their screen name or nickname? What about their real name?
7. Did you save or printout out a copy of the conversation? a. If you saved it, can you provide a copy to us? (If possible, try to observe them saving it.) b. If they printed it out, try to get the original hard copy.

Newsgroup- Related Crimes

1. What is the newsgroup’s complete name?
2. Do you access newsgroups via software or through a website?
3. Did you save the posting to a computer? a. Can you provide an electronic copy? (If possible observe them saving it). b. If not, did you print a copy of the posting and can we have the original hard  copy?

4. Is this newsgroup available directly from your ISP?
5. Which newsgroup service do you use? 
6. Which computer server did you use to access this newsgroup? What is the name of the posting? 

E-mail-Related Crimes
1. Do you have the email( s) address of the person who sent the email, including the header information? (For a discussion about email headers and their collection see Chapter 8 .) 
2. Did you still have the email( s)? Where? 
3. Can you provide an electronic copy to us? (Ask to observe the copying.) (This copy needs to include the header information.) 
4. Do you have a printed copy of the email and may we have the original? 
5. Is your email software- or web-based?
According to Broward County Criminal Attorney William Ryan Moore, on average, we glance over 12 or more fraudulent emails per day. Most of these crimes are attempted by uneducated individuals, often over seas, who receive very little response by intended victims.

Social Networking-Related Crimes

Questioning the Cyber-Crime Victim
Investigation Tips by Broward County Criminal Attorney William Ryan Moore: Interviewing the Cyber-Crime Victim
Internet Access
1. Who is your Internet service provider (ISP)?
2. What kind of Internet service do you have?
a. Dial up b. DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) c. Cable d. Wireless
3. Where did this occur? (your home, work, school, etc.?)
4. What are your email addresses?
5. Who owns the computer you used? (you, your employer, school, parents, etc.)
6. Did you access the Internet through a network? (employer, school, etc.)
7. Did you access the Internet through a wireless network and is so where?  

Chat-Related Crimes

1. What was the chat service where this occurred?
2. What was the date and time this occurred?
3. What is the chatroom( s) name where this occurred?
4. What is your screen name or nickname in this chatroom? What is the suspect’s screen name or nickname? Do you know their real name?
5. Did the chatroom have an operator or moderator and if so, what is their screen name or nickname? Do you know their real name?
6. Did you recognize anyone else in the chatroom and if so, what is their screen name or nickname? What about their real name?
7. Did you save or printout out a copy of the conversation? a. If you saved it, can you provide a copy to us? (If possible, try to observe them saving it.) b. If they printed it out, try to get the original hard copy.

Newsgroup- Related Crimes

1. What is the newsgroup’s complete name?
2. Do you access newsgroups via software or through a website?
3. Did you save the posting to a computer? a. Can you provide an electronic copy? (If possible observe them saving it). b. If not, did you print a copy of the posting and can we have the original hard  copy?

4. Is this newsgroup available directly from your ISP?
5. Which newsgroup service do you use? 
6. Which computer server did you use to access this newsgroup? What is the name of the posting? 

E-mail-Related Crimes
1. Do you have the email( s) address of the person who sent the email, including the header information? (For a discussion about email headers and their collection see Chapter 8 .) 
2. Did you still have the email( s)? Where? 
3. Can you provide an electronic copy to us? (Ask to observe the copying.) (This copy needs to include the header information.) 
4. Do you have a printed copy of the email and may we have the original? 
5. Is your email software- or web-based?
According to Broward County Criminal Attorney William Ryan Moore, on average, we glance over 12 or more fraudulent emails per day. Most of these crimes are attempted by uneducated individuals, often over seas, who receive very little response by intended victims.

Social Networking-Related Crimes
1. What is your profile name and which email account is associated with it? 
2. Where was the post made, your shared area or another user’s area? 
3. What profile name made the post? 
4. Who else may have seen the post and what is their profile name (real name)? 
5. Was the message sent to your profile and if so do you still have it? 
(It may be very important to get access to this message, which will point to the originating profile.)

For more information contact Broward County Criminal Attorney William Ryan Moore.