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Broward County Crime News: Rolex Theft

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According to the Broward County Sun Sentinel crime news section, a woman by the name of Subhanna Beyah has struck again it is being accused of seducing a wealthy victim, drugging and bringing him home with the intention of stealing his Rolex.
This comes less than three months after pleading guilty to the same type of crime in Broward County criminal Court. According to the disposition in that case, the similar crime took place in the year 2013, yet was resolved on January 29, 2016. Court documents reflect that Beyah pled to a single count of grand theft in the 1st° Degree and received a probation sentence of five years. This probation sense was transferred to Miami-Dade, however, Broward County still retains jurisdiction over the substantive case. Beyah’s January 2016 plea in Broward required that she was to pay $50 per month for the cost of her probation supervision, that she pay for random drug testing, that she not associate with the named victim in the case either directly or indirectly. Under the terms of the plea to the Broward County case, Beyah was also required as a special condition to testify truthfully and consistently against the codefendant in that case should the codefendant proceed to trial. The defendant was also required to remain in the day program of a facility known as the Camillus House.
According to the state of Florida Department of Corrections affidavit for violation of probation, Beyah is alleged to have violated the terms of her supervision even prior to picking up the most recent theft charge. According to reports, Beyah failed to comply with all instructions given to her by her probation officer and as grounds that she violated her probation, her assigned probation officer stated that on January 15, 2016 and again on February 2, 2016 the offender was instructed to comply with all conditions pursuant to her plea agreement at the Camillus House as instructed.
According to William R. Moore, a criminal defense attorney in Broward County, any new arrests will undoubtedly be added to the current charges for violation of probation.
Florida law regarding grand theft as it pertains to varying degrees of severity is as follows:
The crime of Grand Theft is defined in Section 812.014, Florida Statutes. Under the law, Grand Theft occurs where:
1.    The defendant knowingly and unlawfully obtained or used or endeavored to obtain or use the property of another,
2.    The defendant did so with the intent to temporarily or permanently (a) deprive the victim of his or her right to the property or any benefit from the property, or (b) appropriate the property of the victim to his or her own use or to the use of any person not entitled to it; and
3.    The property was valued at $300 or more.
Penalties for Grand Theft
In Florida, the penalties available for Grand Theft will depend on how the charge is classified. The classification applied to an offense generally depends on the value of the property taken. A higher value and higher degree of theft will generally subject the accused to harsher penalties.

Grand Theft: Third Degree

An offense will be charged as Grand Theft in the Third Degree if the property stolen is:
•    Valued at $300 or more, but less than $5,000;
•    Valued at $5,000 or more, but less than $10,000;
•    Valued at $10,000 or more, but less than $20,000;
•    A will, codicil, or other testamentary instrument;
•    A firearm;
•    A motor vehicle;
•    Any commercially farmed animal, including any animal of the equine, bovine, or swine class or other grazing animal; a bee colony of a registered beekeeper; and aquaculture species raised at a certified aquaculture facility. If the property stolen is aquaculture species raised at a certified aquaculture facility, then a $10,000 fine shall be imposed;
•    Any fire extinguisher;
•    Any amount of citrus fruit consisting of 2,000 or more individual pieces of fruit;
•    Taken from a designated construction site identified by the posting of a sign as provided for in s. 810.09(2)(d);
•    Any stop sign;
•    Anhydrous ammonia;
•    Any amount of a controlled substance as defined in s. 893.02.
Penalty: Grand Theft of the Third Degree is classified as a third degree felony, with penalties of up to 5 years in prison or 5 years of probation and a $5,000 fine.

Grand Theft: Second Degree

An offense will be charged as Grand Theft in the Second Degree if the property stolen is:
•    Valued at $20,000 or more, but less than $100,000;
•    Cargo valued at less than $50,000 that has entered the stream of interstate or intrastate commerce from the shipper’s loading platform to the consignee’s receiving dock;
•    Emergency medical equipment, valued at $300 or more, that is taken from a facility licensed under chapter 395 or from an aircraft or vehicle permitted under chapter 401; or
•    Law enforcement equipment, valued at $300 or more, that is taken from an authorized emergency vehicle, as defined in s. 316.003.
Penalty: Grand Theft of the Second Degree is a Second Degree Felony, with penalties up to 15 years in prison or 15 years of probation, and a $10,000 fine.

Grand Theft: First Degree

An offense will be charged as Grand Theft in the First Degree if the property stolen is:
•    Valued at $100,000 or more or is a semitrailer that was deployed by a law enforcement officer; or
•    Cargo valued at $50,000 or more that has entered the stream of interstate or intrastate commerce from the shipper’s loading platform to the consignee’s receiving dock; or
•    If the offender commits any grand theft and: (a) In the course of committing the offense the offender uses a motor vehicle as an instrumentality to assist in committing the offense and thereby damages the real property of another; or (b) In the course of committing the offense the offender causes damage to the real or personal property of another in excess of $1,000.
Penalty: Grand Theft of the First Degree carries penalties of up to 30 years in prison, with a maximum fine of $10,000.