Defense Attorney located in Broward County FL

Changes to Treatment of Non-Violent Criminals

Broward Lawyers

Last month William Moore Criminal Defense published a series of articles that detailed the basis for opinions outline the United States Court direction with respect to non-violent defendants who are ultimately convicted. William Moore, a well respected Criminal Lawyer in Broward County stated that that Federal Justice Department is likely to move to change the way non-violent criminals are treated. In part this is a move to reduce the prison-industrial complex, the high cost of maintaining prisoners, the racial disparities among prisoners, and more. Many law makers have already moved bills that will try to reduce prison terms for non-violent criminals.

Team Work

The Obama administration too is moving in this direction with both Democrats and Republicans willing to work to reduce the presence of non-violent criminals in prisons.

Saving Money

If this move is enforced, prosecutors will no longer have to seek minimum mandatory prison terms for a lot of non-violent crimes such as using drugs without becoming violent, failing to report to probationary officers, and so on. The Justice Department will remove the minimum mandatory imprisonment for many of the non-violent crimes that do not affect society or harm anyone. Many states have already moved in this direction.

 

Only Logical

This means that those who are facing a prison term because of a conviction in a non-violent crime or who are already imprisoned for such a crime can appeal their sentence and asked to be released once the change becomes effective. While actual implementation of the changes can take some time, those who have been convicted should talk to their lawyers about appealing the terms of imprisonment.

Law makers have proposed other ways of keeping tab of the non-violent criminals such as ankle bracelets. This will enable the criminals to remain productive members of society even as they pay the penalty for their crimes. Why put them in jail which only costs the tax payer when they can work somewhere and pay back the tax payer?

With governors of states such as Texas already having taken steps to reduce the number of prisoners in the state prisons, those living in such states should also explore the possibility of an early release.